Joy is your Birthright: Seth’s Take on the State of Grace, Part 2

This morning I spent a few hours with my 19 month-old grandson. My daughter told me how she had heard him in the morning in his crib, babbling and singing to his stuffed animals for 30 minutes before she went in to get him up. Children are able to feel their state of grace easily and they are rewarded with imagination, playfulness, and freedom to just BE.

Seth says,

When you create a poem or a song or a painting you are in a state of play, of enjoyment, of freedom. You intend to make something different, to produce a new version of reality. You create out of love, for the sake of the experience . . . When you think: ‘life is earnest, ‘ and decide to put away childish things, then often you lose sight of your own creativity and become so deadly serious that you cannot play, even mentally . . . Limiting ideas therefore predispose you to accept others of a similar nature. Exuberant ideas of freedom, spontaneity and joy automatically collect others of their kind. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 40)

Seth’s advice is to let go and enjoy the spontaneity of your own being. He says we must abandon ourselves to the power of our own lifeform. If we think back to the creation story, that power came directly from All That Is. So it is very powerful, indeed.

We won’t all be artists, poets, and musicians, but we can be just as free and creative in any area of work, play, or life in general. We can create from love while cooking, cleaning, building, strategizing, teaching, serving others, and in thousands of other ways. It is a matter of looking at things with a good attitude. I can look upon doing laundry as drudgery, but I can also be happy that I am doing something for the family I love or with gratitude for the nice clothes I have and be happy about that.

You can mow the lawn and hate the chore or you can do it with love for being outdoors and creating a beautiful yard for your family to enjoy.

You can work in a corporation as an accountant, but instead of thinking of it as grunt work you can revel in the happiness of using your intellect, anticipating obstacles, and devising solutions. It all depends on how you look at it.

In Seth’s view of reality creation, everything we encounter in the world is created by us. If we work and play with a joyful attitude, more joy appears in our reality.

The conscious mind is a window through which you look outward–and looking outward, perceive the fruits of your inner mind. Often you let false beliefs blur that great vision. Your joy, vitality and accomplishment do not come from the outside to you as the result of events that ‘happen to you.’ They spring from inner events that are the result of your beliefs. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 27)

We should do everything with as much love as possible, Seth says, because love is what incites action and it catalyzes dynamos of energy. Believe it or not, even hate is a means of returning to love, according to Seth:

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Joy is your Birthright: Seth’s Take on the State of Grace, Part 1

In previous posts we’ve tackled several topics that relate to things that appear to have “gone wrong” in our world based on our erroneous beliefs, such as evil, hate, fanaticism, and illness in old age.

Today, we will examine what makes life wonderful, how to be happy and fruitful, and how to dwell in peace, love, and grace.

If there is one thing we can say definitively it is that Seth has a life-affirming view of physical reality and humanity. While most religions teach that humanity is sinful, in need of forgiveness and redemption, or that physical reality is only a poor, substandard version of higher levels of existence, Seth says, “NO,” this is not correct. (Although Seth does say that physical reality is camouflaged so that we often misunderstand its true nature, he always endorses the worthiness of being in physical reality and the creative part we play in existence.)

In many instances throughout the Seth material Seth talks about the purpose of our lives being to enjoy life and even to have fun–to just BE. While this may seem somewhat shallow, it really isn’t when you put it in the context of his assertions on the nature of reality.

So we’ll start with Seth’s version of the creation story, which I happen to think is one of the most beautiful sections of Seth and Jane’s whole body of work. Once we understand that, then we can see how all love, peace, joy, happiness, creativity and vitality flow from that point.

To begin with, it’s important to understand that the story, as Seth tells it, is metaphorical. He says that we need a myth to help us sense inner truths that we are not yet able to grasp with our minds. But he asserts that the myth does express the essential truth of our genesis. The entire story, a little too long to quote here in its entirety can be found in Dreams, “Evolution,” and Value Fulfillment, Volume One, Session 883 and also in Chapter 18 of The Seth Material. One other reminder, Seth asks that we try not to think of All That Is as a human being, which would be inaccurate.

It all starts with a condition called “non-being,” which is not the same thing as nothingness. It is a state “in which probabilities and possibilities are known and anticipated but blocked from expression.” (The Seth Material, Buccaneer Books, NY, 1970, p. 264) And this is the state of affairs where the story begins. All That is or God, if you prefer, existed in a purely psychological dimension. The closest comparison to anything we can contemplate is our own dream state. In this state,

All That Is possessed a creativity of such magnificence that its slightest imaginings, dreams, thoughts, feelings or moods attained a kind of reality, a vividness, an intensity, that almost demanded freedom.

The experience, the subjective universe, the ‘mind’ of All That Is, was so brilliant, so distinct, that All That Is almost became lost, mentally wandering within this ever-flourishing, ever-growing landscape.

Each thought, feeling, dream or mood was itself indelibly marked with all of the attributes of this infinite subjectivity. Each glowed and quivered with its own creativity, its own desire to create as it had been created. (Dreams, ‘Evolution,’ and Value Fulfillment, Volume One, Amber-Allen, 1986/1997, p. 129)

When all of these endless possibilities were created in the mind of All That is, Seth says that they existed in “divine fact,” that is, they existed in all ways except for physical objectivity. Once this process started, it just kept on and new generations of divine fact spilled out with ever-increasing diversity and vividness. The pressure was growing as All That Is “realized that its own ever-multiplying thoughts and dreams themselves yearned to enjoy those greater gifts of creativity with which they were innately endowed.” (Dreams, “Evolution,” and Value Fulfillment, Volume 1, p. 129)

So imagine that every conceivable thing that ever was or ever will be was already realized at one level, but yearned for more. So All That is kept dreaming and imagining and added more and more detail to his progeny. But they clamored to be released from this state and to become actual. Seth called this the Cosmic Dilemma: To give over the massive potential and creativity to create to Its own creations would be the ultimate gift of love, but to give them actuality would also mean losing a part of Its own consciousness. And Seth says that this dilemma created a kind of divine agony for All That Is.

Of course we know what choice was made–the buildup of psychic energy exploded in a flash of creation and the multitudinous imaginings of All That Is were given the gift of actuality. Because of this gift, we are all co-creators of our world and carry a divine spark of All That Is within us, as does every other form of matter.

All That Is loves all that it has created down to the least, for it realizes the dearness and uniqueness of each consciousness which has been wrest from such a state and at such a price. It is triumphant and joyful at each development taken by each consciousness, for this is an added triumph against that first state, and it revels and takes joy in the slightest creative act of each of its issues. (The Seth Material, p. 268)

According to this beautiful story, we have the same agony within us to create, that urge to bring new ideas into actuality. This is because we are all extensions of All That Is. We are similarly divine and similarly creative and at every moment we are still connected to everything else, including All That Is. Seth says that it is now up to us to direct the outcome of our lives “with joy and vigor, clearing your conscious mind so that the deeper knowledge of your greater identity can form joyous expressions in the world of flesh.” (The Nature of Personal Reality, Amber-Allen, 1974/1994, p. 14)

“These connection between you and All That Is can never be severed, and Its awareness is so delicate and focused that Its attention is indeed directed with a prime creator’s love to each consciousness.” (The Seth Material, p. 269) So, we are loved at all times and so are all of our creations, whatever they may be.

What Seth is really talking about here is the fact that we are perpetually in a state of grace–a “condition in which all growth is effortless, a transparent, joyful acquiescence that is a ground requirement of all existence” (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 157) Seth says that we become aware of our state of grace when we recognize our purpose and freedom, as well as our rightful place in existence.

 

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Hate, Violence, and Evil: What’s Fear Got To Do With It? Part 2

In Part 1 we were reminded that Seth looks at evil as the result of blocked fulfillment. And we talked about how wrong-thinking was the root problem. Now, we are going to go a little deeper into Seth’s ideas about guilt and aggression. For misunderstanding about these two concepts is the primary cause of fear and ultimately evil actions.

First of all, Seth tells us that when we turned the corner evolutionarily, from being more like animals to becoming thinking human beings, we lost the natural sense of justice and integrity that operates in the animal kingdom. Basically, animals don’t kill or violate each other except for sustenance, to protect themselves or their young, or for other reasons that make sense if we don’t anthropomorphize them. And Seth says animals do not experience guilt.

A cat playfully killing a mouse and eating it is not evil. It suffers no guilt. On biological levels both animals understand. The consciousness of the mouse, under the innate knowledge of impending pain, leaves its body. The cat uses the warm flesh. The mouse itself has been hunter as well as prey, and both understand the terms in ways that are very difficult to explain. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 139)

Once we lost the animal sense of justice and courtesy, we acquired natural guilt as a way to substitute for this lost sense and to prevent violation. It is a tool for learning how to use our free will and consciousness wisely. The whole point of natural guilt is to make us feel bad about any violation, so that we will not do the same thing again.

Its original purpose was to enable you to empathize on an aware level with yourselves and other members of creaturehood, so that you could consciously control what was previously handled on a biological level alone. Guilt in that respect therefore has a strong natural basis, and when it is perverted, misused or misunderstood, it has the great terrifying energy of any runaway basic phenomenon. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 140)

The rule for living, according to Seth, should be: “Do not violate.” That means one should not violate any person, animal, or the environment. Ever. Although we could probably come up with dozens of times when we might feel justified in some sort of violation–say for self-defense or to prevent a catastrophe of a higher order,  Seth says this isn’t so. If you remember from our description of the nature of reality in Part 1, everything we experience has been pulled from the infinite probability field of Framework 2. If we were creating consciously at all times, we would not find ourselves in situations where we needed to defend ourselves in the first place.

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Hate, Violence, and Evil: What’s Fear Got To Do With It? Part 1

It’s been on my mind for some time, on account of all the violence, terrorism, and fearfulness in the world, to delve into Seth’s ideas on topics like these. Doing the research was tricky since Seth talks about all of these topics , in practically every book he dictated through Jane Roberts.

Like most of Seth’s remarks, though, there are layers of information rather than straightforward, one-dimensional definitions. So, one has to be very careful to avoid misunderstanding. In the case of the topics of hate, evil, and fear, there has to be a foundational understanding of the nature of reality according to Seth. Otherwise, one might think that Seth blames the victims of violence or that he denies the experience of evil in our lives, both of which are incorrect.

So, here in a nutshell, is Seth’s basic description of reality:

  1. We experience ourselves here in a physical world as separate beings at the mercy of cause and effect, as well as random events. Seth calls this level of reality Framework 1.
  2. Beyond or behind this reality is a hidden reality, mostly unknown  to us, except in uncommon instances, such as in near death experiences. This is called Framework 2. Framework 2 is responsible for all the physical effects and laws of Framework 1.
  3. The essence of this unknown reality is Consciousness. In Framework 2, all possibilities and probabilities exist simultaneously in one timeless present and everything is connected to everything else, rather than separate or isolated.
  4. From each moment in Framework 1 we call forth probably events out of Framework 2 and this is what we experience as our life.
  5. This is done through our thoughts, beliefs, desires, and expectations. The intensity of our desire or emotion determines how quickly or easily things materialize in our reality.

Although greatly summarized, this definition will do for our purposes. While this view of reality may seem theoretical, if you stop and think about it, you will be able to find many examples that suggest how it might be accurate.

Think about an athlete who has just won the Masters Golf Tournament. In the interview that follows, he says, “I dreamed about this since I was a little kid . . . I actually saw myself walking up the 18th fairway and heard the applause.” That is  a positive example. But the inverse can be just as likely. Imagine a woman whose mother died of cancer at the age of 52. The daughter believes and fears that she will have the same fate. And she does. In both cases, they created their realities through their beliefs, one driven by desire, the other by fear–both very powerful drivers.

Ok, with that refresher on reality creation behind us, let’s get back to the main topics of evil, hate, and fear.

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