Joy is your Birthright: Seth’s Take on the State of Grace, Part 2

This morning I spent a few hours with my 19 month-old grandson. My daughter told me how she had heard him in the morning in his crib, babbling and singing to his stuffed animals for 30 minutes before she went in to get him up. Children are able to feel their state of grace easily and they are rewarded with imagination, playfulness, and freedom to just BE.

Seth says,

When you create a poem or a song or a painting you are in a state of play, of enjoyment, of freedom. You intend to make something different, to produce a new version of reality. You create out of love, for the sake of the experience . . . When you think: ‘life is earnest, ‘ and decide to put away childish things, then often you lose sight of your own creativity and become so deadly serious that you cannot play, even mentally . . . Limiting ideas therefore predispose you to accept others of a similar nature. Exuberant ideas of freedom, spontaneity and joy automatically collect others of their kind. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 40)

Seth’s advice is to let go and enjoy the spontaneity of your own being. He says we must abandon ourselves to the power of our own lifeform. If we think back to the creation story, that power came directly from All That Is. So it is very powerful, indeed.

We won’t all be artists, poets, and musicians, but we can be just as free and creative in any area of work, play, or life in general. We can create from love while cooking, cleaning, building, strategizing, teaching, serving others, and in thousands of other ways. It is a matter of looking at things with a good attitude. I can look upon doing laundry as drudgery, but I can also be happy that I am doing something for the family I love or with gratitude for the nice clothes I have and be happy about that.

You can mow the lawn and hate the chore or you can do it with love for being outdoors and creating a beautiful yard for your family to enjoy.

You can work in a corporation as an accountant, but instead of thinking of it as grunt work you can revel in the happiness of using your intellect, anticipating obstacles, and devising solutions. It all depends on how you look at it.

In Seth’s view of reality creation, everything we encounter in the world is created by us. If we work and play with a joyful attitude, more joy appears in our reality.

The conscious mind is a window through which you look outward–and looking outward, perceive the fruits of your inner mind. Often you let false beliefs blur that great vision. Your joy, vitality and accomplishment do not come from the outside to you as the result of events that ‘happen to you.’ They spring from inner events that are the result of your beliefs. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 27)

We should do everything with as much love as possible, Seth says, because love is what incites action and it catalyzes dynamos of energy. Believe it or not, even hate is a means of returning to love, according to Seth:

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Hate, Violence, and Evil: What’s Fear Got To Do With It? Part 2

In Part 1 we were reminded that Seth looks at evil as the result of blocked fulfillment. And we talked about how wrong-thinking was the root problem. Now, we are going to go a little deeper into Seth’s ideas about guilt and aggression. For misunderstanding about these two concepts is the primary cause of fear and ultimately evil actions.

First of all, Seth tells us that when we turned the corner evolutionarily, from being more like animals to becoming thinking human beings, we lost the natural sense of justice and integrity that operates in the animal kingdom. Basically, animals don’t kill or violate each other except for sustenance, to protect themselves or their young, or for other reasons that make sense if we don’t anthropomorphize them. And Seth says animals do not experience guilt.

A cat playfully killing a mouse and eating it is not evil. It suffers no guilt. On biological levels both animals understand. The consciousness of the mouse, under the innate knowledge of impending pain, leaves its body. The cat uses the warm flesh. The mouse itself has been hunter as well as prey, and both understand the terms in ways that are very difficult to explain. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 139)

Once we lost the animal sense of justice and courtesy, we acquired natural guilt as a way to substitute for this lost sense and to prevent violation. It is a tool for learning how to use our free will and consciousness wisely. The whole point of natural guilt is to make us feel bad about any violation, so that we will not do the same thing again.

Its original purpose was to enable you to empathize on an aware level with yourselves and other members of creaturehood, so that you could consciously control what was previously handled on a biological level alone. Guilt in that respect therefore has a strong natural basis, and when it is perverted, misused or misunderstood, it has the great terrifying energy of any runaway basic phenomenon. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 140)

The rule for living, according to Seth, should be: “Do not violate.” That means one should not violate any person, animal, or the environment. Ever. Although we could probably come up with dozens of times when we might feel justified in some sort of violation–say for self-defense or to prevent a catastrophe of a higher order,  Seth says this isn’t so. If you remember from our description of the nature of reality in Part 1, everything we experience has been pulled from the infinite probability field of Framework 2. If we were creating consciously at all times, we would not find ourselves in situations where we needed to defend ourselves in the first place.

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