Creativity Will Shift Us to Higher Consciousness and Heal Our World, Part 1

When most people think of creativity what comes to mind are people using exceptional abilities to make music, art, literature, and design or perhaps they think of great idea-people like inventors, scientists, or entrepreneurs. And it’s true–creativity, inspiration, and imagination drive these accomplishments and these people.

When Seth speaks of creativity, however, it has an even broader meaning. He is talking about our life-force, vitality–that very thing that gives us our being, our will to live, to act, and to know.

This primal creativity applies to all people, not just some specially gifted ones and, according to Seth, also applies to animals, plants, and even things. (We’ll get to that later)

This creative thrust that is behind everything in our world comes from All That Is. We’ve talked about this before but it bears repeating. All that is, in an act of love, released those mental creations to become actualized and gave them the same ability to create worlds that It had.

Consciousness, which is what All That Is really is, transformed Itself into the many facets of nature, all beings, and into every molecule, cell, atom, and particle.

The universe is the natural extension of divine creativity and intent, lovingly formed, from the inside out–so there was consciousness before there was matter, and not the other way around. (Dreams, ‘Evolution,’ and Value Fulfillment, Volume 1, Amber-Allen, 1986/1997, p. 156)

An important characteristic of consciousness, Seth says, is that it operates as both waves and particles. (Today, we know from quantum physics that this is the actual nature of reality. Learn more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave%E2%80%93particle_duality

Seth says that being part of All That Is in its wave-like manifestation means that on one level, absolutely everything is connected to everything else and is able to communicate with and be aware of everything else.

This ability is something that we have forgotten, even though, at one time, in our distant history ancient people used this ability. At the core of virtually every great religion is a mystical tradition which embraces the idea of unity; this idea of a connected whole is an essential element of the Perennial Philosophy–a philosophy that reemerges throughout history in different centuries and cultures. (Read a bit here: http://www.centerforsacredsciences.org/publications/the-mystical-core-of-the-great-traditions.htm

In fact, Seth gave some interesting examples of this ability throughout his books. Here is one:

In those times, all species shared their dreams in a way that is now quite unconscious for your kind, so that in dreams man inquired of the animals also–long before he learned to follow the animal tracks, for example, where is there food or water? What is the lay of the land? Man explored the planet because his dreams told him that the land was there. (Dreams, ‘Evolution,’ and Value Fulfillment, Volume 1, p. 173)

So in this view nothing exists in isolation. Everything is connected.

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Joy is your Birthright: Seth’s Take on the State of Grace, Part 2

This morning I spent a few hours with my 19 month-old grandson. My daughter told me how she had heard him in the morning in his crib, babbling and singing to his stuffed animals for 30 minutes before she went in to get him up. Children are able to feel their state of grace easily and they are rewarded with imagination, playfulness, and freedom to just BE.

Seth says,

When you create a poem or a song or a painting you are in a state of play, of enjoyment, of freedom. You intend to make something different, to produce a new version of reality. You create out of love, for the sake of the experience . . . When you think: ‘life is earnest, ‘ and decide to put away childish things, then often you lose sight of your own creativity and become so deadly serious that you cannot play, even mentally . . . Limiting ideas therefore predispose you to accept others of a similar nature. Exuberant ideas of freedom, spontaneity and joy automatically collect others of their kind. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 40)

Seth’s advice is to let go and enjoy the spontaneity of your own being. He says we must abandon ourselves to the power of our own lifeform. If we think back to the creation story, that power came directly from All That Is. So it is very powerful, indeed.

We won’t all be artists, poets, and musicians, but we can be just as free and creative in any area of work, play, or life in general. We can create from love while cooking, cleaning, building, strategizing, teaching, serving others, and in thousands of other ways. It is a matter of looking at things with a good attitude. I can look upon doing laundry as drudgery, but I can also be happy that I am doing something for the family I love or with gratitude for the nice clothes I have and be happy about that.

You can mow the lawn and hate the chore or you can do it with love for being outdoors and creating a beautiful yard for your family to enjoy.

You can work in a corporation as an accountant, but instead of thinking of it as grunt work you can revel in the happiness of using your intellect, anticipating obstacles, and devising solutions. It all depends on how you look at it.

In Seth’s view of reality creation, everything we encounter in the world is created by us. If we work and play with a joyful attitude, more joy appears in our reality.

The conscious mind is a window through which you look outward–and looking outward, perceive the fruits of your inner mind. Often you let false beliefs blur that great vision. Your joy, vitality and accomplishment do not come from the outside to you as the result of events that ‘happen to you.’ They spring from inner events that are the result of your beliefs. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 27)

We should do everything with as much love as possible, Seth says, because love is what incites action and it catalyzes dynamos of energy. Believe it or not, even hate is a means of returning to love, according to Seth:

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Hate, Violence, and Evil: What’s Fear Got To Do With It? Part 2

In Part 1 we were reminded that Seth looks at evil as the result of blocked fulfillment. And we talked about how wrong-thinking was the root problem. Now, we are going to go a little deeper into Seth’s ideas about guilt and aggression. For misunderstanding about these two concepts is the primary cause of fear and ultimately evil actions.

First of all, Seth tells us that when we turned the corner evolutionarily, from being more like animals to becoming thinking human beings, we lost the natural sense of justice and integrity that operates in the animal kingdom. Basically, animals don’t kill or violate each other except for sustenance, to protect themselves or their young, or for other reasons that make sense if we don’t anthropomorphize them. And Seth says animals do not experience guilt.

A cat playfully killing a mouse and eating it is not evil. It suffers no guilt. On biological levels both animals understand. The consciousness of the mouse, under the innate knowledge of impending pain, leaves its body. The cat uses the warm flesh. The mouse itself has been hunter as well as prey, and both understand the terms in ways that are very difficult to explain. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 139)

Once we lost the animal sense of justice and courtesy, we acquired natural guilt as a way to substitute for this lost sense and to prevent violation. It is a tool for learning how to use our free will and consciousness wisely. The whole point of natural guilt is to make us feel bad about any violation, so that we will not do the same thing again.

Its original purpose was to enable you to empathize on an aware level with yourselves and other members of creaturehood, so that you could consciously control what was previously handled on a biological level alone. Guilt in that respect therefore has a strong natural basis, and when it is perverted, misused or misunderstood, it has the great terrifying energy of any runaway basic phenomenon. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 140)

The rule for living, according to Seth, should be: “Do not violate.” That means one should not violate any person, animal, or the environment. Ever. Although we could probably come up with dozens of times when we might feel justified in some sort of violation–say for self-defense or to prevent a catastrophe of a higher order,  Seth says this isn’t so. If you remember from our description of the nature of reality in Part 1, everything we experience has been pulled from the infinite probability field of Framework 2. If we were creating consciously at all times, we would not find ourselves in situations where we needed to defend ourselves in the first place.

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Hate, Violence, and Evil: What’s Fear Got To Do With It? Part 1

It’s been on my mind for some time, on account of all the violence, terrorism, and fearfulness in the world, to delve into Seth’s ideas on topics like these. Doing the research was tricky since Seth talks about all of these topics , in practically every book he dictated through Jane Roberts.

Like most of Seth’s remarks, though, there are layers of information rather than straightforward, one-dimensional definitions. So, one has to be very careful to avoid misunderstanding. In the case of the topics of hate, evil, and fear, there has to be a foundational understanding of the nature of reality according to Seth. Otherwise, one might think that Seth blames the victims of violence or that he denies the experience of evil in our lives, both of which are incorrect.

So, here in a nutshell, is Seth’s basic description of reality:

  1. We experience ourselves here in a physical world as separate beings at the mercy of cause and effect, as well as random events. Seth calls this level of reality Framework 1.
  2. Beyond or behind this reality is a hidden reality, mostly unknown  to us, except in uncommon instances, such as in near death experiences. This is called Framework 2. Framework 2 is responsible for all the physical effects and laws of Framework 1.
  3. The essence of this unknown reality is Consciousness. In Framework 2, all possibilities and probabilities exist simultaneously in one timeless present and everything is connected to everything else, rather than separate or isolated.
  4. From each moment in Framework 1 we call forth probably events out of Framework 2 and this is what we experience as our life.
  5. This is done through our thoughts, beliefs, desires, and expectations. The intensity of our desire or emotion determines how quickly or easily things materialize in our reality.

Although greatly summarized, this definition will do for our purposes. While this view of reality may seem theoretical, if you stop and think about it, you will be able to find many examples that suggest how it might be accurate.

Think about an athlete who has just won the Masters Golf Tournament. In the interview that follows, he says, “I dreamed about this since I was a little kid . . . I actually saw myself walking up the 18th fairway and heard the applause.” That is  a positive example. But the inverse can be just as likely. Imagine a woman whose mother died of cancer at the age of 52. The daughter believes and fears that she will have the same fate. And she does. In both cases, they created their realities through their beliefs, one driven by desire, the other by fear–both very powerful drivers.

Ok, with that refresher on reality creation behind us, let’s get back to the main topics of evil, hate, and fear.

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Seth’s Value Fulfillment Promise: Align with your True Self and Flow Through Life with More Ease, Part 2

According to Seth, we create our problems through mistaken beliefs. We actually create everything in our world that we view as negative. It is all a misunderstanding of the nature of reality and our own divinity. And this ties back to our original question: Why are some things so difficult?

In our divine state, if we could only believe in it, we are safe; we are powerful; we can do anything we decide to do; there is no reason for fear or to doubt ourselves. And even though we all have different propensities for self-expression, there is a wholeness, a unity to the world, that is vast enough to accommodate all the varieties of being-ness. And if we did not allow fear to enter the equation, all of life would be cooperative. That’s just the way it is.

If it were not for this most basic, initial loving cooperation, that is a given quality in life itself, life would not have continued. Each individual . . . automatically seeks to enhance the quality of life itself–not only for itself but for all of reality as well . . . regardless of the beliefs that may lead you to misinterpret the actions of nature, casting some of its creatures in a reprehensible light. (Dreams, ‘Evolution,’ and Value Fulfillment, Volume 1,  p. 198)

Most people, I think, have a certain amount of trouble remembering who they are and their true purpose. A lot of people claim to have no idea at all what their purpose is. Maybe that is because, in our culture, there is such an emphasis on big, splashy achievements. We celebrate the top athletes, the rags to riches stories, the improbably social media stars. But Seth says that we are attaining value fulfillment in every little thing we do, and in simply being.

We get feedback when we are doing something that is in line with our True Self. It might be a feeling of pure happiness or delight, or it might be unstoppable energy to accomplish something, or it might be total confidence without much effort.

Unfortunately, in our culture we are conditioned by what our parents, religion, social group, or even the media dictate that we ought to be, do, or strive for. And when we buy into these “rules” coming from the outside that is when things go awry.

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Seth’s Value Fulfillment Promise: Align with Your True Self and Flow Through Life with More Ease. Part 1

Do you ever wonder why some things you do are so difficult and others just seem to happen smoothly and easily? And the difficulty has nothing to do with how capable you are or how complex the thing you want to do is. It can be as big a deal as getting along with your spouse or your boss or as simple as driving to work or setting up a get-together with friends. Some things just seem to resist our efforts while others don’t.

Two things that Seth says give a hint about why this is so.

That which is in harmony with the universe, with All That Is, has a natural inborn impetus that will dissolve all impediments. (Dreams, ‘Evolution’ and Value Fulfillment, Volume 1. Amber-Allen, 1986/1997, p. 240)

When you trust the thrust of your own life, you are always supported. (Dreams, ‘Evolution’ and Value Fulfillment. Volume 1, p. 111)

Although it sounds like this should be easy . . . I’ll just line up with my True Self and everything will be a piece of cake. In fact, it’s something we find very, very hard to do.

The “natural born impetus” or “thrust” that Seth speaks of is one of my favorite topics in all of the Seth material. He calls it value fulfillment. But even Seth says that it is a difficult concept to define.

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How You Age is Your Choice–Part 2

We of the baby boom generation, are often dealing with aging parents, even while becoming “seniors” ourselves. We have had to take the car keys away; refurbish homes with new safety railings and ramps; worry about what our parents are eating; and, if we don’t live nearby, to hire aids and nurses to help with the dispensing of prescriptions and to drive parents to doctor appointments. Probably the worst thing for our aged parents is loneliness. For those who are fortunate to still have friends and family that they can see and talk with regularly, life is better, no matter what their physical or even mental restrictions.

Because of worry, we often view all the changes in our parents  as problems. Sometimes the busyness of life gives us an excuse not to slow down enough to interact with our parents at their own speed. But just because our parents can’t move around as quickly as before does not mean that they have turned into different people or that they cannot enjoy a new experience.

When an individual becomes older . . . the focus for that particular kind of concentration [intellect and critical thinking] is no longer so immediately available. The mind actually becomes more itself, freer to use more of its abilities, allowed to stray from restricted areas, to assimilate, to acknowledge and create. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 256)

As someone very familiar with Seth’s words, I tried to think of what he had advised about aging while I dealt with my own father’s situation. My Dad had a pretty routine life for someone of his generation, which included naval service during WWII, a long-term marriage and fatherhood, a lifetime blue-collar job, and a certain amount of ups and downs, like anyone else.

When he was in his early 50s, he had a massive heart attack and quintuple bypass surgery, which set him back for about a year. However, he recovered physically and mentally and was able to carry on. When he was 77 my Mom died. Within a few months of her death, my father’s home of 50 years was taken by eminent domain and he found himself having to move to a strange place. This made him extremely angry and he felt betrayed. Two such major life setbacks in a short time affected him greatly. It was no surprise to me when he was suddenly diagnosed with a rare form of cancer. While living alone in a new, strange place, he had to go for radiation treatments and take himself to all kinds of appointments. There were nurses, aids, and social workers coming to his house. He took at least a dozen pills every day and had to fend for himself for meals, since he didn’t cook. As he got older there were other health issues, surgeries, and so forth–all this as my father aged into his 80s.

Meanwhile, Dad showed signs of increasing dementia. I took him for a geriatric evaluation and was told that he had early stage Alzheimer’s disease, as well as signs of depression, and that he should not be living alone. The office suggested a very nice assisted living center with specialized memory care. We were able to make this change, which my father agreed to. In the first few weeks he did not seem to adjust well, but soon after he began to thrive. He made friends, participated in lots of activities, had a girlfriend, ate regular meals again, and had a trained staff member to dispense his prescriptions.

Once the stress of living alone was removed, I began to get to know my father in a whole new way. As we spoke daily, I learned a lot about his outlook on life and the things that he was curious about. Soon, aspects of his much younger personality began to emerge. This must have been what he was like before marriage and family. He came across as much more of a risk-taker than I remembered. He showed great curiosity about progress and changes in the world, especially technology. And he frequently explained to me that people ought to stay positive and believe in themselves if they expected to be happy and successful in life.

One somewhat shocking thing that happened was that I received a call from the assisted living staff to say that my father was acting in a “sexually inappropriate” manner by saying suggestive things and even groping at staff and residents. I found this so out of character for my father, who had always seemed to me a proper gentleman, conservative in his ways. I also heard about how he finagled extra drinks for himself during Happy Hour and was the life of the party at social gatherings! What explanation could there be for this alternative side of my father’s personality?

I should not have been so surprised. Seth says:

As the mind within the body clearly sees its earthly time coming to an end, mental and psychic accelerations take place. These are in many ways like adolescent experiences in their great bursts of creative activity, with the resulting formation of questions, and the preparation for a completely new kind of personality growth and fulfillment. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 253)

Seth said that, unfortunately, these new aspects of personality make those around the elderly uncomfortable and are often viewed as “grotesque” because they don’t fit the stereotypes we have of old people. Their behavior is simply attributed to mental deterioration. But Seth says that:

In old age. . . it is here, as in adolescence, that the greatest creativity may emerge but go unrecognized. This era could be more advantageous to the individual and to the race than any other period, were it recognized for what it is and understood. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 255)

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