Trumpcare/Ryancare vs Obamacare: What Seth Might Say–Part 2

While I believe that Seth would approve of most of these treatments especially those geared toward removing energy blockages, Seth’s instructions go far beyond what we think of today as “alternative” or “complementary medicine.” So, let’s examine them.

It is because you conceive of the body as existing within one field only that you have not had more success in dealing with human illness . . .

The inner self, which has been called the soul, has connections through the entire physical organism, and is not concentrated in any one portion . . . your universe is actually a coming together and merging that has its existence, and is a blending of data from many planes, that would be considered foreign by the intellect. (The Early Sessions, Book 3, New Awareness Network, 1998, pp. 202-203)

Further, Seth insists that our natural state is one of good health, vitality, and exuberance. He says that not only should we be in good health, but that we have a duty to maintain our good health to the best of our abilities. This all ties in closely with Seth’s teachings on Value Fulfillment. http://sethsays.org/index.php/2016/05/08/seths-value-fulfillment-promise-align-with-your-true-self-and-flow-through-life-with-more-ease-part-1/

As you know,

Each segment of life is motivated by value fulfillment, and is therefore always attempting to use and develop all of its abilities and potentials, and to express itself in as many probable ways as possible, in a process that. . . takes into consideration the needs and desires of each other segment of life. (The Way Toward Health, Amber-Allen, 1997, p. 206)

How does value fulfillment relate to this discussion? Well, Seth claims that it is precisely when there are blockages in our energy or spirit that we create imbalances that lead to disease or illness:

In all instances of ill health, the psychic inner forces are being misdirected. The aim of medicine should then be to aid the inner self to direct its own energy along other lines. (The Early Sessions, Book 3, p. 211)

The “lines” Seth is talking about are the paths toward our own value fulfillment. Most people are familiar, I think, with the research that shows that most heart attacks happen on Mondays and that the researchers suspect that the cause is having to face another work week. http://myheart.net/articles/predict-heart-attack/

Of course, it is not simply that people are lazy and don’t want to work, but that so many people are working at unfulfilling, spirit-deadening jobs.

The emotional climate, though intangible, is intimately known by each individual as it exists within himself, and it is the best indication of his physical condition for thoughts and emotions as independent electrical actions have great influence directly upon the physical mechanism, acting indeed as electric storms which flash through the entire nervous system; or as great stabilizers as the case may be, and with of course many middle varieties of influence. (The Early Sessions, Book 3, p. 222)

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Trumpcare/Ryancare vs Obamacare: What Seth Might Say–Part 1

Lately, I’ve been listening to debates going on in Congress, in the media, and among friends about the topic of our healthcare system in the United States. As you know, the Republicans have been vowing and voting to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) for 7 or 8 years now. However, even with both the Legislative and Executive branches of government now in Republican hands, they still seem embarrassingly unprepared to right the problem that they have decried for so long.

Although, between the current Republican and Democratic approaches, I think the Republican one is crueler, in this blog, I am not going to take sides one way or the other. I think it is all too apparent that, regardless which political party is in power, American healthcare is:

  1. Expensive–both from overpricing and from over-usage
  2. Full of improper incentives to overuse technology and other services
  3. Dependent on prescription drugs, which themselves are overpriced
  4. Litigious
  5. Focused too much on illness rather than wellness
  6. Fragmented and duplicative
  7. Overly influenced or controlled by special interest groups

Instead, I’d like to point out why neither the Democrats nor the Republicans will ever be successful in their goals if their overall thinking about health doesn’t change.

I worked in the healthcare industry both directly and indirectly for quite a few years, first as part of senior management at a Blue Cross & Blue Shield plan and later as a business consultant with many clients in healthcare, including a Preferred Provider Organization (PPO), several hospitals, a commercial insurer, and several doctors’ groups. Even after retiring from that work, I have watched developments closely because of my interest in the field. I have seen the myriad problems from the inside.

In addition, I have had to “work the system” myself as a consumer for my own family and as a fiduciary for my father with respect to Medicare, the government’s Prescription Drug Program, and the Veterans Administration benefits program. It has been a nightmare, to put it bluntly.

While I think that everyone should be able to get care when they are sick, my experience convinces me that big bureaucracy makes any effort to actually care for people or help them pay for that care worse, not better. I am equally convinced that the system is fatally flawed in several ways, that no amount of “market forces,” “free choice” or “greater accessibility” will redeem. So, I think both the Democrats and Republicans have it wrong.

My worldview, inspired by Seth, influences my thoughts on this matter. However, as Seth always instructed his readers to do, I have tested my beliefs for myself and examined them with an open mind. Nonetheless, I try to remember philosopher, Jacob Neddleman’s, timeless advice: “You should be open-minded but not so open-minded that your brains fall out.”

Although I have had my thoughts on this matter for years, they were just a farrago of ideas in my mind—until recently. I just read a new book by an author, Amit Goswami, whose previous books I liked. This new one is called Quantum Economics: Unleashing the Power of an Economics of Consciousness, which brought all my inchoate thoughts together. In it, Goswami puts forward the idea that scientific materialism (the belief that only physical reality is real) has biased our science, economics, academic research, our ideas about money and careers, and virtually every area of life, and that no amount of economic manipulation can correct the underlying flaw in that worldview. I agree with him.

He identifies the underlying problem as a lack of acceptance that there is more to life than just matter or, to put it another way, to a belief that only things that can be scientifically measured or counted are real. Some people won’t even understand what that criticism means; but we Seth readers are well aware that there are indeed different planes of consciousness.

Of course, denying the existence of all but material or measurable things is ridiculous. We all have feelings and emotions that can’t be measured. We feel an inner vitality and interest in life that can’t be measured. We look for meaning and fulfillment in our lives that can’t be satisfied with just material things. We have values that matter to us that defy quantification. And, most importantly, we all experience love, which is also beyond measurement.

Yet our economic system doesn’t account for any of those things. You won’t find a factor in GDP that assess how much meaning or love is moving around the country at any time. But it clearly does matter, doesn’t it?

How does Goswami’s theory apply to healthcare? Surprisingly, the values that he identifies as missing from our system coordinate nicely with many of Seth’s statements on the subject, which I will address in a moment. Continue reading[..]

Seth and Mass Events–The zika virus

The overall message of the Seth material is one of optimism. Any Seth reader knows that Seth stresses the personal power of every individual to shape his or her own reality. And throughout the material, Seth continually reminds us that All-That-Is supports value fulfillment for everyone. How then, are we Seth students to understand the many negative events and situations in the world? Seth gives a plausible explanation for disasters, tragedies, and epidemics that still fits in with his overall theme of personal power. It involves learning.

We have to look at the beliefs behind the physical manifestations in order to understand what is going on. Seth explains this quite well in his book, “The Individual and the Nature of Mass Events.”* Mass events are events that reflect and influence large swaths of the population.

Seth says that individuals cannot separate their realities from the societal and cultural attitudes that surround them and in which they participate. In fact, “The magnification of individual reality combines and enlarges to form vast mass reactions.” (p. 9)

Let’s look at the zika virus epidemic that was recently declared a Global Health Emergency by the World Health Organization. The zika virus is allegedly linked to a frightening birth defect called microcephaly–a condition that causes babies to be born with unusually small heads and often severe brain damage. The first outbreak of this latest epidemic took place in Brazil and is quickly spreading to other Latin American countries and beyond. Zika virus has been around for a long time, in Africa, but without causing the effect we are seeing now, such as microcephaly. So why is it suddenly a problem?

We know that Seth says we all create our own realities and that “no person becomes ill unless that illness serves a psychic or psychological reason.” (p.10) In the case of zika, it is not only the child who is affected, but also the parents, families, communities, governments, and so forth.

What is the point?

According to Seth,

The environment in which an outbreak occurs points to the political, sociological and economic conditions that have evolved, causing such a disorder. Often such outbreaks take place after political or social action . . . has failed, or is considered hopeless. (p. 20)

Let’s look at the political, social, and economic conditions of Brazil and Latin America to see how this applies.

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