Trumpcare/Ryancare vs Obamacare: What Seth Might Say–Part 2

While I believe that Seth would approve of most of these treatments especially those geared toward removing energy blockages, Seth’s instructions go far beyond what we think of today as “alternative” or “complementary medicine.” So, let’s examine them.

It is because you conceive of the body as existing within one field only that you have not had more success in dealing with human illness . . .

The inner self, which has been called the soul, has connections through the entire physical organism, and is not concentrated in any one portion . . . your universe is actually a coming together and merging that has its existence, and is a blending of data from many planes, that would be considered foreign by the intellect. (The Early Sessions, Book 3, New Awareness Network, 1998, pp. 202-203)

Further, Seth insists that our natural state is one of good health, vitality, and exuberance. He says that not only should we be in good health, but that we have a duty to maintain our good health to the best of our abilities. This all ties in closely with Seth’s teachings on Value Fulfillment. http://sethsays.org/index.php/2016/05/08/seths-value-fulfillment-promise-align-with-your-true-self-and-flow-through-life-with-more-ease-part-1/

As you know,

Each segment of life is motivated by value fulfillment, and is therefore always attempting to use and develop all of its abilities and potentials, and to express itself in as many probable ways as possible, in a process that. . . takes into consideration the needs and desires of each other segment of life. (The Way Toward Health, Amber-Allen, 1997, p. 206)

How does value fulfillment relate to this discussion? Well, Seth claims that it is precisely when there are blockages in our energy or spirit that we create imbalances that lead to disease or illness:

In all instances of ill health, the psychic inner forces are being misdirected. The aim of medicine should then be to aid the inner self to direct its own energy along other lines. (The Early Sessions, Book 3, p. 211)

The “lines” Seth is talking about are the paths toward our own value fulfillment. Most people are familiar, I think, with the research that shows that most heart attacks happen on Mondays and that the researchers suspect that the cause is having to face another work week. http://myheart.net/articles/predict-heart-attack/

Of course, it is not simply that people are lazy and don’t want to work, but that so many people are working at unfulfilling, spirit-deadening jobs.

The emotional climate, though intangible, is intimately known by each individual as it exists within himself, and it is the best indication of his physical condition for thoughts and emotions as independent electrical actions have great influence directly upon the physical mechanism, acting indeed as electric storms which flash through the entire nervous system; or as great stabilizers as the case may be, and with of course many middle varieties of influence. (The Early Sessions, Book 3, p. 222)

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Trumpcare/Ryancare vs Obamacare: What Seth Might Say–Part 1

Lately, I’ve been listening to debates going on in Congress, in the media, and among friends about the topic of our healthcare system in the United States. As you know, the Republicans have been vowing and voting to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) for 7 or 8 years now. However, even with both the Legislative and Executive branches of government now in Republican hands, they still seem embarrassingly unprepared to right the problem that they have decried for so long.

Although, between the current Republican and Democratic approaches, I think the Republican one is crueler, in this blog, I am not going to take sides one way or the other. I think it is all too apparent that, regardless which political party is in power, American healthcare is:

  1. Expensive–both from overpricing and from over-usage
  2. Full of improper incentives to overuse technology and other services
  3. Dependent on prescription drugs, which themselves are overpriced
  4. Litigious
  5. Focused too much on illness rather than wellness
  6. Fragmented and duplicative
  7. Overly influenced or controlled by special interest groups

Instead, I’d like to point out why neither the Democrats nor the Republicans will ever be successful in their goals if their overall thinking about health doesn’t change.

I worked in the healthcare industry both directly and indirectly for quite a few years, first as part of senior management at a Blue Cross & Blue Shield plan and later as a business consultant with many clients in healthcare, including a Preferred Provider Organization (PPO), several hospitals, a commercial insurer, and several doctors’ groups. Even after retiring from that work, I have watched developments closely because of my interest in the field. I have seen the myriad problems from the inside.

In addition, I have had to “work the system” myself as a consumer for my own family and as a fiduciary for my father with respect to Medicare, the government’s Prescription Drug Program, and the Veterans Administration benefits program. It has been a nightmare, to put it bluntly.

While I think that everyone should be able to get care when they are sick, my experience convinces me that big bureaucracy makes any effort to actually care for people or help them pay for that care worse, not better. I am equally convinced that the system is fatally flawed in several ways, that no amount of “market forces,” “free choice” or “greater accessibility” will redeem. So, I think both the Democrats and Republicans have it wrong.

My worldview, inspired by Seth, influences my thoughts on this matter. However, as Seth always instructed his readers to do, I have tested my beliefs for myself and examined them with an open mind. Nonetheless, I try to remember philosopher, Jacob Neddleman’s, timeless advice: “You should be open-minded but not so open-minded that your brains fall out.”

Although I have had my thoughts on this matter for years, they were just a farrago of ideas in my mind—until recently. I just read a new book by an author, Amit Goswami, whose previous books I liked. This new one is called Quantum Economics: Unleashing the Power of an Economics of Consciousness, which brought all my inchoate thoughts together. In it, Goswami puts forward the idea that scientific materialism (the belief that only physical reality is real) has biased our science, economics, academic research, our ideas about money and careers, and virtually every area of life, and that no amount of economic manipulation can correct the underlying flaw in that worldview. I agree with him.

He identifies the underlying problem as a lack of acceptance that there is more to life than just matter or, to put it another way, to a belief that only things that can be scientifically measured or counted are real. Some people won’t even understand what that criticism means; but we Seth readers are well aware that there are indeed different planes of consciousness.

Of course, denying the existence of all but material or measurable things is ridiculous. We all have feelings and emotions that can’t be measured. We feel an inner vitality and interest in life that can’t be measured. We look for meaning and fulfillment in our lives that can’t be satisfied with just material things. We have values that matter to us that defy quantification. And, most importantly, we all experience love, which is also beyond measurement.

Yet our economic system doesn’t account for any of those things. You won’t find a factor in GDP that assess how much meaning or love is moving around the country at any time. But it clearly does matter, doesn’t it?

How does Goswami’s theory apply to healthcare? Surprisingly, the values that he identifies as missing from our system coordinate nicely with many of Seth’s statements on the subject, which I will address in a moment. Continue reading[..]

Seth’s Advice on How to be Happy: Be a Practicing Idealist in 2017

In my last post, the U.S. Presidential Election had just concluded and reactions and analyses were swirling turbulently around us.

Since then, things have calmed down a bit. There was no mass exodus to Canada. There have been some protests and petitions, an unfortunate increase in hate crimes (as reported by the Southern Poverty Law Center and the FBI), and the media is still trying to figure out how to deal with the unconventional and unpredictable Mr. Trump. The President Elect, through his cabinet picks, has set off some alarm bells.

Whether you are someone who is anticipating the coming change with eager anticipation or, alternatively, filled with trepidation and even horror, life must go on.

In this time of uncertainty, it might be sensible to go back to basics—to think about what people want and need at the most fundamental level. By that I mean, their very purpose in living or being. It is important to remember, from Seth’s viewpoint, that individuals create the living picture of our society, politics, government, culture, and so forth, not the other way around. So we have an opportunity to shape the future.

Seth’s teachings about practicing idealists, closely tied to his statements about “natural law” and human impulses can help us understand how to do this.

Natural Law and Value Fulfillment

In many posts on this blog I have mentioned Value Fulfillment. According to Seth, it is one of the fundamental aspects of reality. To refresh your memory:

You are born with a desire to fulfill your abilities, to move and act in the world. Those assumptions are the basis of what I will call natural law. (The Individual and the Nature of Mass Events, Amber-Allen, 1995/1981, p. 259)

So what are the Natural Laws that Value Fulfillment is based upon?

Natural Laws are the inner laws of nature that underlie all realities, not just the one we are of aware of. They guide all kinds of life. Seth says they are laws of love and cooperation. These laws are what make us feel safe and secure in the universe, understand that we have a part to play in the whole, and give us confidence that we will creatively add our gifts, talents and outlook to the world. In a nutshell, Natural Laws are what give life meaning.

Seth says that we all come into this world with an impetus toward growth and action–but not growth in terms of size or how much space we take up. Rather, it is a qualitative measure based on how fulfilled we are in the things that matter to us or which we most value.

Chances are that you can look within yourself, your own family or group of friends and identify what some of those values might be for each of them. Some people are competitive and value a challenge. Some people are nurturers and feel fulfilled when they are helping others. There are those who have to feel active all the time; or creative, artistic, or musical. Some people have the need to act as catalysts or to make others laugh or to use their athletic abilities; others get their thrills from always learning or teaching. The list is long and varied.

According to Seth, the way the universe is configured allows for every individual to pursue his or her own Value Fulfillment without impinging on anyone else in a negative way. That is the ideal.

You are born seeking the actualization of the ideal. You are born seeking to add value to the quality of life, to add characteristics, energies, abilities to life that only you can individually contribute to the world, and to attain a state of being that is uniquely yours, while adding to the Value Fulfillment of the world. (The Individual and the Nature of Mass Events, p. 259)

So far, we humans seem to have missed the memo on this. In fact we have phrases in our language that reinforce the idea of winners and losers, such as “zero-sum game,” in which the only way for one person to “win” is for another to “lose,” so that together they net out at zero.

This is contrary to how the universe actually works, according to Seth. He says that, if we were all true to our values—faithful to being our True Selves—conflicts would dissipate.

Your True Self, Impulses, and Spontaneity

People tell me that they don’t know who their True Self is. It is the Self that you are naturally, without having to try. Think back to childhood. Were you a quiet child who liked to make things out of natural materials you found in the woods? Or were you a child who had to be the center of attention, putting on plays and musicals? Were you someone who liked to read or explore or did you prefer playing sports? Maybe making new friends came easy and you made everyone laugh. Were you kind to others and eager to share? Did you like to build and destroy and build again? Children are more likely to act on their impulses than adults, so it is easier to identify what they inherently value. They are still in their pure form.

Seth says that if we act on our impulses they will lead us to Value Fulfillment? That sounds kind of scary. We’ve come to think of our impulses as things we should keep in check. Seth disagrees; by impulses he means the underlying motive power of everything in existence.

Impulses . . . provide impetus toward motion, coaxing the physical body and the mental person toward utilization of physical and mental powers. (The Individual and the Nature of Mass Events, p. 242)

Seth reminds us that impulses are what keep the body going. Every cell and organ has an impulse to do its unique job. Our impulses help us make specific choices out of all the probable choices we might consider. Children are often scolded for their impulses. But impulses are what make them use their muscles and minds. Parents often are fearful that their teenagers’ impulsiveness will lead to trouble. But their impulses are also what allow them to learn, explore, and mature.

Impulses are doorways to action, satisfaction, the exertion of natural mental and physical power, the avenue for your private expression – the avenue where your private expression intersects the physical world and impresses it. (The Individual and the Nature of Mass Events, p. 243)

We get into trouble, according to Seth, because we ignore our small, everyday impulses, either because we have been shamed into doing so or when we act a certain way to meet some set of standards imposed on us by parents, culture, religion, gender norms, business, or even by our own egos. Continue reading[..]

Joy is your Birthright: Seth’s Take on the State of Grace, Part 2

This morning I spent a few hours with my 19 month-old grandson. My daughter told me how she had heard him in the morning in his crib, babbling and singing to his stuffed animals for 30 minutes before she went in to get him up. Children are able to feel their state of grace easily and they are rewarded with imagination, playfulness, and freedom to just BE.

Seth says,

When you create a poem or a song or a painting you are in a state of play, of enjoyment, of freedom. You intend to make something different, to produce a new version of reality. You create out of love, for the sake of the experience . . . When you think: ‘life is earnest, ‘ and decide to put away childish things, then often you lose sight of your own creativity and become so deadly serious that you cannot play, even mentally . . . Limiting ideas therefore predispose you to accept others of a similar nature. Exuberant ideas of freedom, spontaneity and joy automatically collect others of their kind. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 40)

Seth’s advice is to let go and enjoy the spontaneity of your own being. He says we must abandon ourselves to the power of our own lifeform. If we think back to the creation story, that power came directly from All That Is. So it is very powerful, indeed.

We won’t all be artists, poets, and musicians, but we can be just as free and creative in any area of work, play, or life in general. We can create from love while cooking, cleaning, building, strategizing, teaching, serving others, and in thousands of other ways. It is a matter of looking at things with a good attitude. I can look upon doing laundry as drudgery, but I can also be happy that I am doing something for the family I love or with gratitude for the nice clothes I have and be happy about that.

You can mow the lawn and hate the chore or you can do it with love for being outdoors and creating a beautiful yard for your family to enjoy.

You can work in a corporation as an accountant, but instead of thinking of it as grunt work you can revel in the happiness of using your intellect, anticipating obstacles, and devising solutions. It all depends on how you look at it.

In Seth’s view of reality creation, everything we encounter in the world is created by us. If we work and play with a joyful attitude, more joy appears in our reality.

The conscious mind is a window through which you look outward–and looking outward, perceive the fruits of your inner mind. Often you let false beliefs blur that great vision. Your joy, vitality and accomplishment do not come from the outside to you as the result of events that ‘happen to you.’ They spring from inner events that are the result of your beliefs. (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 27)

We should do everything with as much love as possible, Seth says, because love is what incites action and it catalyzes dynamos of energy. Believe it or not, even hate is a means of returning to love, according to Seth:

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Joy is your Birthright: Seth’s Take on the State of Grace, Part 1

In previous posts we’ve tackled several topics that relate to things that appear to have “gone wrong” in our world based on our erroneous beliefs, such as evil, hate, fanaticism, and illness in old age.

Today, we will examine what makes life wonderful, how to be happy and fruitful, and how to dwell in peace, love, and grace.

If there is one thing we can say definitively it is that Seth has a life-affirming view of physical reality and humanity. While most religions teach that humanity is sinful, in need of forgiveness and redemption, or that physical reality is only a poor, substandard version of higher levels of existence, Seth says, “NO,” this is not correct. (Although Seth does say that physical reality is camouflaged so that we often misunderstand its true nature, he always endorses the worthiness of being in physical reality and the creative part we play in existence.)

In many instances throughout the Seth material Seth talks about the purpose of our lives being to enjoy life and even to have fun–to just BE. While this may seem somewhat shallow, it really isn’t when you put it in the context of his assertions on the nature of reality.

So we’ll start with Seth’s version of the creation story, which I happen to think is one of the most beautiful sections of Seth and Jane’s whole body of work. Once we understand that, then we can see how all love, peace, joy, happiness, creativity and vitality flow from that point.

To begin with, it’s important to understand that the story, as Seth tells it, is metaphorical. He says that we need a myth to help us sense inner truths that we are not yet able to grasp with our minds. But he asserts that the myth does express the essential truth of our genesis. The entire story, a little too long to quote here in its entirety can be found in Dreams, “Evolution,” and Value Fulfillment, Volume One, Session 883 and also in Chapter 18 of The Seth Material. One other reminder, Seth asks that we try not to think of All That Is as a human being, which would be inaccurate.

It all starts with a condition called “non-being,” which is not the same thing as nothingness. It is a state “in which probabilities and possibilities are known and anticipated but blocked from expression.” (The Seth Material, Buccaneer Books, NY, 1970, p. 264) And this is the state of affairs where the story begins. All That is or God, if you prefer, existed in a purely psychological dimension. The closest comparison to anything we can contemplate is our own dream state. In this state,

All That Is possessed a creativity of such magnificence that its slightest imaginings, dreams, thoughts, feelings or moods attained a kind of reality, a vividness, an intensity, that almost demanded freedom.

The experience, the subjective universe, the ‘mind’ of All That Is, was so brilliant, so distinct, that All That Is almost became lost, mentally wandering within this ever-flourishing, ever-growing landscape.

Each thought, feeling, dream or mood was itself indelibly marked with all of the attributes of this infinite subjectivity. Each glowed and quivered with its own creativity, its own desire to create as it had been created. (Dreams, ‘Evolution,’ and Value Fulfillment, Volume One, Amber-Allen, 1986/1997, p. 129)

When all of these endless possibilities were created in the mind of All That is, Seth says that they existed in “divine fact,” that is, they existed in all ways except for physical objectivity. Once this process started, it just kept on and new generations of divine fact spilled out with ever-increasing diversity and vividness. The pressure was growing as All That Is “realized that its own ever-multiplying thoughts and dreams themselves yearned to enjoy those greater gifts of creativity with which they were innately endowed.” (Dreams, “Evolution,” and Value Fulfillment, Volume 1, p. 129)

So imagine that every conceivable thing that ever was or ever will be was already realized at one level, but yearned for more. So All That is kept dreaming and imagining and added more and more detail to his progeny. But they clamored to be released from this state and to become actual. Seth called this the Cosmic Dilemma: To give over the massive potential and creativity to create to Its own creations would be the ultimate gift of love, but to give them actuality would also mean losing a part of Its own consciousness. And Seth says that this dilemma created a kind of divine agony for All That Is.

Of course we know what choice was made–the buildup of psychic energy exploded in a flash of creation and the multitudinous imaginings of All That Is were given the gift of actuality. Because of this gift, we are all co-creators of our world and carry a divine spark of All That Is within us, as does every other form of matter.

All That Is loves all that it has created down to the least, for it realizes the dearness and uniqueness of each consciousness which has been wrest from such a state and at such a price. It is triumphant and joyful at each development taken by each consciousness, for this is an added triumph against that first state, and it revels and takes joy in the slightest creative act of each of its issues. (The Seth Material, p. 268)

According to this beautiful story, we have the same agony within us to create, that urge to bring new ideas into actuality. This is because we are all extensions of All That Is. We are similarly divine and similarly creative and at every moment we are still connected to everything else, including All That Is. Seth says that it is now up to us to direct the outcome of our lives “with joy and vigor, clearing your conscious mind so that the deeper knowledge of your greater identity can form joyous expressions in the world of flesh.” (The Nature of Personal Reality, Amber-Allen, 1974/1994, p. 14)

“These connection between you and All That Is can never be severed, and Its awareness is so delicate and focused that Its attention is indeed directed with a prime creator’s love to each consciousness.” (The Seth Material, p. 269) So, we are loved at all times and so are all of our creations, whatever they may be.

What Seth is really talking about here is the fact that we are perpetually in a state of grace–a “condition in which all growth is effortless, a transparent, joyful acquiescence that is a ground requirement of all existence” (The Nature of Personal Reality, p. 157) Seth says that we become aware of our state of grace when we recognize our purpose and freedom, as well as our rightful place in existence.

 

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